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Who initiates a sleep study? And why haven't I been offered one?

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  • Who initiates a sleep study? And why haven't I been offered one?

    In previous dealings with my health care provider, at no point was a sleep study mentioned and yet I would have thought this a key part of diagnosis, unless I am deeply wide of the mark.

    I most definitely fall into the category of patient who have numerous daily bouts of nodding off, even whilst in conversation or activity.

    My mother who is also being treated for sleep apnea gets a regular yearly study, so am I suffering from the post code lottery for my health care?

  • #2
    Originally posted by ChelseaCSL View Post
    In previous dealings with my health care provider, at no point was a sleep study mentioned and yet I would have thought this a key part of diagnosis, unless I am deeply wide of the mark.

    I most definitely fall into the category of patient who have numerous daily bouts of nodding off, even whilst in conversation or activity.

    My mother who is also being treated for sleep apnea gets a regular yearly study, so am I suffering from the post code lottery for my health care?
    Not heard of yearly studies, I just had the one seven years back. Thank heaven for that too, for whilst not as bad as TF's recent experience it wasn't what you would call a comfortable night.

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    • #3
      Who is your "health care provider", Chelsea? How far are you along the road of having possible OSA investigated.

      The norm is that you go to your GP, s/he refers you to ENT consultant and the ball slowly rolls for NHS and more quickly for private medicine (Intus can have you PAPing in a matter of days from the get go).
      Respironics REMstar 'M' Series APAP.
      Resmed Mirage 'Quattro FX' Full Face Mask with a 'Quattro' headgear.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Tigers Fan View Post

        The norm is that you go to your GP, s/he refers you to ENT consultant and the ball slowly rolls for NHS and more quickly for private medicine (Intus can have you PAPing in a matter of days from the get go).
        Indeed, although we know it can sometimes take two or three GP visits before they will refer you to a sleep clinic. Once you do it really varies how long you'll wait for both the test and, if OSA is confirmed, treatment.

        If you did want to speed up proceedings then we do our own tests that Tigers Fan referred to, which you can find out about at Sleep-Study.co.uk. As with any private healthcare there are costs involved with this, so it's up to the individual to weigh up the costs with the speed of the process. You may not want to wait 48 weeks (the average for Scotland, others parts of the country may vary) and get instead start treatment in a couple of weeks.
        Tom @ Intus

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        • #5
          "As with any private healthcare there are costs involved with this"

          As with any private healthcare - the costs are high. It seems that anything that is vaguely connected to health (and I include dentists in this monstrous regiment) seem to think they can charge anything they like. I was quoted 10,000 for three implanted teeth - and that was from an NHS dental hospital! Not even flowers and a private waiting room!
          DeVilbiss Sleep Cube DV54 Auto
          Sleepweaver

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          • #6
            Originally posted by dravidio View Post
            "As with any private healthcare there are costs involved with this"

            As with any private healthcare - the costs are high. It seems that anything that is vaguely connected to health (and I include dentists in this monstrous regiment) seem to think they can charge anything they like. I was quoted 10,000 for three implanted teeth - and that was from an NHS dental hospital! Not even flowers and a private waiting room!
            Depends what you consider monstrous - that example clearly is, but a sleep study with us is 100 which, while still notable, many consider very good value for the time and hassle that it saves.

            I can't promise flowers with it though!
            Tom @ Intus

            You can now follow Intus on Twitter!

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            • #7
              I paid a lot more for my sleep study with INTUS - but then it wasn't a simple oximeter test (which you can do for yourself) and which you can buy on Amazon for 22.99. My BMI was less than 25 so I had to go for the more exhaustive test - the Multi Channel Respiratory Study which costs 249 - that's just to hire the machine. True you get the doctor's diagnosis, without which you are not able to buy your own APAP machine - which sell over here at about a 40% premium on what they cost in the USA - and there is no VAT so that isn't an excuse.

              I have found INTUS to be efficient, to stock a wide variety of products but this is a high profit margin sector so let's not pretend they are in the business for altruistic reasons.
              DeVilbiss Sleep Cube DV54 Auto
              Sleepweaver

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              • #8
                Why would anyone want to go private? The costs must be a real shock to the wallet. The whole process is free on the NHS after the doc told me I could have sleep apnea I was sent to a specialist then of to Edinburgh for a sleep study. I had to wait about 2 months but it was sorted in the end. Is the wait really that bad in England?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Sparticus View Post
                  Why would anyone want to go private? The costs must be a real shock to the wallet. The whole process is free on the NHS after the doc told me I could have sleep apnea I was sent to a specialist then of to Edinburgh for a sleep study. I had to wait about 2 months but it was sorted in the end. Is the wait really that bad in England?
                  For the same reasons you'd go for any private healthcare. Faster speed of treatment, get the equipment and mask you want, more control over your own health and well being.

                  Considering some sleep clinics in the UK take an average of 48 weeks from initial doctor's visit to getting a CPAP machine, and given how severe the symptoms some suffer from with OSA, it is little wonder why many do choose to go the faster route and get the equipment privately.

                  The process of taking a sleep study to getting a CPAP machine can be under two weeks privately. They then have a choice of machines and masks to suit them, rather than from the limited choice that a given clinic would offer. There's also the benefit of being able to get advice, help and data analysis at short notice when required, rather than booking appointments.

                  It's just a choice really, many like yourself are happy to go down the NHS route as it is free, while others want their condition confirmed and treated as quickly as possible, aware of both their symptoms and the long-term health risks of untreated OSA.
                  Tom @ Intus

                  You can now follow Intus on Twitter!

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                  • #10
                    I did a bit of both, started via the nhs, mainly because i had no idea what was going on and have added stuff privately (mainly trying diff masks and a travel/back up machine) if anything looks worth a go. Only prob i have is having to keep a track of the number of days i use the travel machine so my hours are compliant as the clinic won't take info off baby gail, not sure why but.....shrug......

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ChelseaCSL View Post
                      In previous dealings with my health care provider, at no point was a sleep study mentioned and yet I would have thought this a key part of diagnosis, unless I am deeply wide of the mark.

                      I most definitely fall into the category of patient who have numerous daily bouts of nodding off, even whilst in conversation or activity.

                      My mother who is also being treated for sleep apnea gets a regular yearly study, so am I suffering from the post code lottery for my health care?
                      Hello!

                      The best way to get diagnosed for OSA is to read the symptoms of OSA and see if they match the symptoms you are experiencing. - http://www.sleep-study.co.uk/about-osa/symptoms.html

                      You mentioned that you fall asleep during the day so that is definitely a common symptom of OSA that I would advise you take a sleep apnoea test for if you haven't already.

                      You can either conduct a sleep test through the NHS if your GP feels necessary, or take a confidential at-home sleep study privately.

                      If you decide to choose to go privately, please see the link below to see whether the sleep study we provide would be suitable for you.

                      If you have already conducted a sleep apnoea study, I look forward to hearing your results and if you've managed to treat your symptoms effectively!
                      Snore? Wake up choking or gasping? These are some of the alert signals that could suggest you might have sleep apnea. Should you take a sleep study test?

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